Archive for the 'Art Criticism' Category

Toronto Biennale? Montreal Biennale!

Last night in Toronto’s Kensington Market, a group of about 60 or so gathered to hear two panel discussions – one on the city’s annual “All Night Contemporary Art Thing”, Nuit Blanche, and the other to discuss the idea of a Toronto Biennale. The TAAC panel last night. Image: P Elaine Sharpe. The event was organized by the Toronto Alliance
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Works of Art for Christmas!

Art makes a great gift. People don’t always realize how inexpensive some books and multiples are, and isn’t it better to support local art scenes than buy from major corporations? I think so. Here are my top picks for Canada’s best art shopping: 1. ART METROPOLE. Started by General Idea in 1974, Art Met continues to specialize in the sale
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New York, New York

So we went to New York for five days last weekend. It was the usual late August hot, humid weather but we had two amazing art experiences that made it all entirely worthwhile. 1. Big Bambu on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum. Doug and Mike Starn’s 40-foot high bamboo structure exemplifies what I always say about artists that do
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Canadian Curator Abroad: Alissa Firth-Eagland

DECONSTRUCT – PERCEIVE – ACT – QUESTION Speaking of young artists, I recently ran into the young, formerly-Toronto based curator Alissa Firth-Eagland, who had been living in Europe for the past two years and who was back in town for a few weeks of studio visits before taking off again.Firth-Eagland, second from left, with her fellow participants of the Curatorial
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Artist Spotlight: Hugh Scott-Douglas

The other day, I did a studio visit with the young artist and very recent OCAD grad (2010) Hugh Scott-Douglas. I had seen his ceramic sculptures at a collectors home and fell in love with them. They were mid-sized, off-balance ovals and loopy shapes that were roughly modeled but heavily and sophisticatedly glazed. Some, he showed at Clint Roenisch’s gallery
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No Culture, No Future?

The Walrus has a good interview with Simon Brault, author of No Culture, No Future, the new book that exploresthe fact that the arts are a necessity, not a luxury. As he puts it, the book is a “call to action” – for Brault, it’s up to everyone to communicate with one another to promote and encourage the arts. Image:
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From Commenting to Contributing, via Berlin

I came across THIS link from the art:21 blog today – in it, Anna Milandri talks about what’s been going on, art-wise, in Berlin recently. Baby Ghost From the 1900s Says Beat It With Your Chain, 2009, by Berlin-based Montreal painter Wil Murray. New York’s Triple Canopy put together six evenings of art-related discussion, including one titled “Print and Demand”
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The Democratization of Art

There seems to have been a lot of talk about the democratization of art lately.  Recently in the Globe and Mail, columnists Russell Smith and Lynn Crosbie have both offered their thoughts on recent developments in the cultural sphere. Jan Vermeer, The Milkmaid, c. 1658-60. Image: navigo.com In THIS article, Smith focuses on an online movement known as “folksonomy …or
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The State of (Canadian) Art Criticism

Michelle Kuran has written an excellent article on the state of Canadian art criticism, in the Ryerson Review of Journalism. Read the article HERE. Young, and determined critic Naja Sayej. Image: torontoist.com Though Ms. Kuran did contact VoCA for our perspective, we were out of town and didn’t manage to make the interview happen. Quoting everyone from R.M Vaughn to
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Today’s Art: Small, Superficial and Self-indulgent

Here’s a fascinating article by Ben Lewis from Prospect magazine. It’s definitely worth reading. In it, he presents the case for “compelling parallels between much of the contemporary art of the last two decades…and French rococo, a movement that extolled frivolity, luxury and dilettantism, patronised by a corrupt and decadent ancien régime.” Damien Hirst, The Physical Impossibility of Death in
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