Archive for the Guy Maddin Tag

Explaining the Winnipeg Art Scene: Part Three

Here is part three of fascinating article written by former Winnipegger Edwin Janzen, an artist and writer currently based in Ottawa. The article was previously published in Drain magazine – you can read the full article, HERE, (under Related Essays) or click HERE for last week’s post on VoCA. Stay tuned as we publish it serially, every week. Winnipeg band
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Explaining the Winnipeg Art Scene: Part Two

Here is part two of fascinating article written by former Winnipegger Edwin Janzen, an artist and writer currently based in Ottawa. The article was previously published in Drain magazine – you can read the full article ,HERE, (under Related Essays) or click HERE for previous posts on VoCA. Stay tuned as we publish it serially, every week. The City of
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How Did Winnipeg and Its Art Become such a Big Deal?

Here is part one of fascinating article written by former Winnipegger Edwin Janzen, an artist and writer currently based in Ottawa. The article was previously published in Drain magazine – you can read the full article HERE, (under Related Essays) or stay tuned as VoCA publishes it serially, every weekend. A work by the Royal Art Lodge. Image: booooooom.com The
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Canada’s New Art Pioneers: One Year Later (Wedge, No.9, Goodwater, The Other Gallery, Clint Roenisch, Magenta, DHC/ART and CSA Space)

It’s been almost a year, and we’re wondering where these out-of-the-box thinkers are now. Click HERE to see what they were up to last year. Wedge Curatorial Projects, Toronto BECOMING: Photographs from the Wedge Collection at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Detroit September 12 – 28 December, 2008 Wayne Salmon, Mr. MacKenzie. Image: mocadetroit.org Wedge’s Kenneth Montague has been busy.
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News, Views and Previews

1. NEWS: CALGARY Dennis Oppenheim’s sculpture, Device to Root out Evil moves to Calgary from Vancouver. Dennis Oppenheim, Device to Root out Evil. Image: metamedia.stanford.edu Originally celebrated by the Vancouver Sculpture Biennale and arguably the most valuable piece of public art in Vancouver, Oppenheim’s compelling 22-foot glass, steel and aluminum structure became more than the Vancouver Public Parks Committee could
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