Archive for the women artists Tag

Who Run the World – Girls? The New Female Warrior

Have you seen Beyonce’s new video Who Run the World (Girls)? I havent’ been able to get it out of my mind. Check it out HERE. A promo image for Beyonce’s new video Run the World (Girls). Image: cdn.idolator.com While pro-women statements have been popular in pop music for a while, (the Spice Girls and Girl Power wasn’t so long
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International Women’s Day: Artist Books by Women

VoCA contributor Bill Clarke, a collector of art and artist books (see previous VoCA posts HERE and HERE) has come back once again with a wonderful post in honour of International Women’s Day. Here is his blog post on a number of artist books by women artists that he has in his increasingly envy-inducing collection: Dorothy Iannone: The Story of
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Loved: Women Rule in Oakville

I went out to Oakville for the opening of Un-home-ly, director Matthew Hyland’s first major exhibition with the gallery. Paulette Phillips, Homewrecker, 2004. All images: VoCA I am told that Matthew’s background is in feminist studies, so it seems fitting that his curatorial career at the gallery should begin with a show of feminist work. The show is the first
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Meanwhile, in Montreal…

Three artists – all women – have been awarded prizes by the City of Montreal. Alana Riley, At the Blackwatch, 2004-2007. Image: redbull381projects.com Alana Riley is an artist whose work I’ve been keeping an eye on.  She has won the Prix Pierre-Ayot, which is presented by the city in collaboration with the Art Dealers Association (AGAC), to an artist under
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It’s All About the Ladies: Paris, Toronto

Finally! In Paris, the largest all-female art exhibition in the world has opened at the Pompidou Centre. elles@centrepompidou will bring together a selection of over 500 works and over 200 artists, including Sonia Delaunay, Frida Khalo, Dorothea Tanning, Joan Mitchell, Maria-Elena Vieira da Silva beside contemporary giants Louise Bourgeois, Rosemarie Trockel, Rachel Whiteread, VALIE EXPORT and Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster. Katie Pretti,
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Underrated Canadian artist: Marcelle Ferron

Québécoise painter Marcelle Ferron was a member of Les Automatistes, a group, led by Paul-Emile Borduas, that believed that painting should be a result of the abstract workings of the inner psyche released subconsciously. Marcelle Ferron. Image: nfb.ca She became well known also for her stained glass pieces, which she learned in Quebec and pursued further while living in Paris
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VoCA Recommends…Independent Sprit

This book is devoted to Canadian women artists from the 19th to mid 20th centuries. It should be necessary reading for anyone who is interested in Canadian history, and/or Canadian art. Please don’t let the cover design dissuade you! Keep reading! Independent Sprit, by A.K. Prakash. Image: fireflybooks.com “It’s tempting to assume that Canadian women artists of the 19th and
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Underrated Canadian artist: Gathie Falk

The 80-year-old Vancouver painter, sculptor, installation and performance artist Gathie Falk has long been inspired by the elements of everyday life: fruit, eggs, men’s shoes, women’s clothing, garden flowers and reading a book, among other things. Her work appears to meld feminine and masculine elements in a unique, charming, serious way. The artist Gathie Falk in her studio, Vancouver, 1983.
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First Ever Online Database of Canadian Women Artists

Nobody has systematically collected data on the women who historically contributed to Canadian art, architecture and craft. Until now. Self-Portrait, by Lilias Torrance Newton, 1929. Newton was the first Canadian painter to paint the portraits of Queen Elizabeth and Prince Phillip. Image: collectionscanada.gc.ca Several weeks ago in Montreal, Concordia’s Canadian Women Artists History Initiative (CWAHI) held a symposium called Connections,
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VoCA loves…Women Artists: Louise Bourgeois and her sisters

It’s no secret that women artists have been notoriously overlooked throughout the course of white, male-dominated art history. Christiane Pflug, Kitchen Door with Esther, 1965. Image: christianepflug.com There are many reasons for this, not least of which is that women’s ability to express themselves was seriously limited before they won the right to vote. For non-asian and non-First Nations women
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